Sensual Technologies

DATES: 14.09.2011 - 21.09.2011 ADDRESS: Building Food Lab & Apparel, Serder-ı Ekrem Caddesi 27
Author(s): 
Barbara Layne
Author(s): 
PK Langshaw
Author(s): 
Janis Jefferies
Location: Building Food Lab & Apparel, Serder-ı Ekrem Caddesi 27

An exhibition  exploring the relationship between the body and sensual/sensing technologies through performance and dynamic garments.

The installation will offer an interrogation of practices that are indebted to the innovative exchange between the sensual, visceral and new technologies.

Bios of the Artists

Barbara Layne

Barbara Layne is a Professor at Concordia University in Montreal and participates in the Interactive Textiles and Wearable Computers research axis at the Hexagram Institute.

As the Director of Studio subTela, Layne lectures and exhibits internationally, most recently at the I-Machine Festival at the Edith Russ Haus in Oldenburg, Germany, in the Awarables exhibition at the Zero-1 festival in San Jose, in Palabras Cruzadas in Buenos Aires & Montreal, Integration at the Ivan Dougherty Gallery in Sydney Australia, and at the Canadian Consulate in Washington DC.  The garments have been involved in techno fashion events in Boston (Seamless) and San Diego (Unravel) and are included in the new publication, Fashionable Technology by Sabine Seymour.

The research has been supported with numerous grants including the Canada Council for the Arts, SSHRC, Hexagram, and the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Quebec.  She is the Principal Investigator of Hexagram’s infrastructure grant from the Canadian Foundation for Innovation.

http://finearts.concordia.ca/research/fineartsresearch/researchlabs/
http://subtela.hexagram.ca/

PK Langshaw

PK Langshaw is associate professor, in the department of Design & Computation Arts and a founding member of Hexagram Institute for research/creation in media arts and technology at Concordia University. she earned her degree from université a quebec a montréal- maitrise en arts plastiques- en création. her hybrid praxis is extracted from concrete poetry, and expanded by the quantic relations of all things verse- diverse, quaquaversal, inversion, transversal, and reversible. the use technologies for innovative adaptation in nomadic performance and filmic interpretation is of particular interest to langshaw. as principle investigator or collaborator, she has been funded by Hexagram, FQRSC research-creation, CASA, the McConnell foundation, CIAM and SSHRC Aid to conferences.

in 2006 Langshaw formed the d_verse research laboratory which reflects the poetic nature of and diverse strategies for collaborative research &  creation. the works are mediated by the forms of garments, poetry, dynamic typography, video and photography and realized in the forms of web sites, bookworks, sensory/sensored environments, film, projections and performative events. all programs and projects respond to social, ecological and economic sustainable practice.

http://www.pklangshaw.com

Janis Jefferies

Janis Jefferies is is an artist, writer and curator, Professor of Visual Arts in the Department of Computing, Goldsmiths University of London,Director of thte Constance Howard Resource and Research Centre in Textiles and Artistic Director of Goldsmiths Digital Studios. GDS is dedicated to collaborations among practicing artists, cultural and media theorists, and innovators in computational media,who together are expanding the boundaries of artistic practice, forging the future of digital technologies and developing new understanding of the interactions between technology and society.

She is an associate researcher with Hexagram (Institute of Media, Arts and Technologies, Montreal, Canada) on two projects, electronic textiles and new forms of media communication in cloth.

Wearable Absence presents a minaframe in which clothing becomes the catalyst and filter within the process of retrieving rich media content according to biological data. The collaborative team at GDS involves the creation of dynamic garments and sensing wallpapers using specific paper technologies (www.m-real.com) and different sensing devices to create a rich database of image and sound.

Wearable Absence is a collaborative project with Janis Jefferies and her research team at The Digital Studios at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

Sensors embedded in the garments detect body states and present video, audio, still image and text files through the various presentation devices embedded in the garments. The clothing is connected to an online, dynamic database of rich media files, dedicated to a particular "absent" person.

http://www.wearableabsence.com/#/home